San Francisco roads improve, but just barely

The condition of roads in San Francisco improved between 2014 and 2015, Mayor Ed Lee and public works officials announced Friday.

An average index of street quality published by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission rose to 68 in 2015 from 67 in 2014.

City officials said the change is due largely to money from a $248 million 2011 Road Repaving and Street Safety Bond that voters approved in 2011.

As a result, the index has risen each year in the past four years from an all-time low of 64 four years ago, city officials said.

City crews have been paving more streets because of the bond money, city officials said. Crews treated and resurfaced a record 927 blocks in the 2015 fiscal year, compared with 913 blocks in the 2014 fiscal year.

Before money from the bond was available, crews resurfaced about 400 blocks a year.

In the last three years, crews have treated 2,694 city-maintained blocks, or 21 percent of the total. Half have been paid for by the 2011 bond.

The street quality index starts at zero and goes to 100.

An index score of zero indicates a badly deteriorated road and a score of 100 indicates a newly paved block.

A block with a score of 85 to 100 is considered “excellent.” A block with a score of 64 to 84 is considered “good.” A block with a score of 50 to 63 is considered “fair” and a score of zero to 49 indicates a block in “poor” condition.

City officials said more than half of the City’s blocks are in good or excellent condition, while less than 25 percent are in poor condition.

The average score for San Francisco streets was at its highest level in the 1980s at 77.

City officials said if the amount of money available for street resurfacing and treatment stays the same, the condition of city streets could reach 70 in less than 10 years.

The current score of 67 is higher than the statewide average of 66.